A large sledgehammer smashes a brick wall, scattering fragments everywhere

WWW UNICEF ORG- worth the bother?

People think Obesity and being overweight is the overwhelming primary health concern and at a cost of $500,000,000,000 (500 billion) per year, it may seem so.
The United States has fallen well short of overcoming this burden, despite the warnings.
It suffers an inter-generational crisis, as more than a million US children are clinically overweight, although (or, as a consequence of) being one of the wealthiest economies in the world.
The question www unicef org continues to ask is ‘Why?’.
Why are things this bad? We have all the information, all the numbers. We have all the programmes.
Why?
An expert says this is a call for immediate action.
“Obesity and being overweight contribute to an estimated four million deaths globally,” Corinna Hawkes (the Global Nutrition Report) wrote in December 2018.

BUT...

Here’s the real eye opener.
In the same report, the Global Nutrition Report stated Malnutrition is a worldwide problem costing over $3,500,000,000,000 ($3.5 trillion) per year.

Malnutrition packs the heavyweight price tag of $3,000,000,000,000 ($3 trillion) MORE dollars, every year.
It was then (2018) anticipated to climb, as the analysis of food and nutrition issues became a growing problem, worldwide.

A Hungry child cries for food.

 “Malnutrition is responsible for more ill-health than any other cause. The figures call for immediate action,” an expert said.

There are two key issues related to malnutrition, at least.
Stunted growth and anaemia.
Overall, malnutrition contributes to about half of all childhood deaths, the research showed.
With the second highest number of malnourished children in the world, the visible signs in India are evident.
Malnourished children are short for their age, indicating their bones lack the nourishment and nutrients required for normal growth.
Their ability to learn is hampered also, not only by a lack of educational opportunity but also due to a lack of nutrient availability to render their brain capable of learning.
It follows that children suffering malnutrition will have less opportunity to provide income for themselves or their families as they inevitably grow to adult responsibility. This will affect their contribution to society, the economy they may choose to live in and place a heavy burden on the shoulders of the Health system and those funding it.
This affects the rest of the world, one way or another.

First Worlders Live a HARD Life!

So it’s an easy OUT to say ‘Well, that’s India; it doesn’t affect me! In fact, I need to lose some weight”.
Wherever there is a First World economy with its’ First World problems- which ice cream to choose or which restaurant to visit, for example- we can blatantly reason our way out of things, instead of taking the conscientious and responsible stance of giving in some way and helping another, less fortunate human being…
Especially if they live in a place we have only visited in movies like ‘Slum- Dog Millionaire’.

It would be presumptuous to say the majority of First Worlders’ feel like this.
In fact, many feel pity for those picture postcards and TV commercials of malnourished and dying infants.
And there is a real desire to help but LIFE gets in the way.
The young one wants to learn ballet or sign up to the local sports club.
They need gear and fees need to be paid.
The older teenager wants a vehicle, something nice. It’s not just about getting from A to B.
The wife wants the kitchen renovated.
You need a Holiday.
Europe sounds nice.
And you would like to help the poor, unfortunate one.
If only you could.

What IF….

Say you are of that nature…
(and if so, you would be in good company:
Danny Kaye, Audrey Hepburn, Téa Leoni, P!NK, Laurence Fishburne, Alyssa Milano, Selena Gomez…
Alyssa Milano, Angie Harmon, Dayle Haddon, Halima Aden, Lucy Liu , Marcus Samuelsson, Tyson Chandler, Vern Yip…
The Major League Baseball (MLB), Major League Soccer (MLS), National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), PGA and LPGA players, Special Olympics, Team USA Olympians, World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), and more
) …
check out this LINK.

www.unicef.org

Go there (UNICEF), figure some way that suits your situation and Step Up.
I’m donating a little, every month.
I know it helps to address that $3.5 TRILLION problem that’s needed every year.

I do it while having a ‘Lavazza Expresso’ made on my Sunbeam Barista (I actually have my first caffeine fix every day, this way) on the 1st of every month. It’s written in to my Google Calendars’ ‘To Do List’ and this starts my new month off on an especially warm, fuzzy feeling that loses momentum as the weight of Life pulls down, like gravity.
Day after day.
I look forward to the beginning of every month.

A selection of Colmbian, Brazilian and Indian coffee, with cream and sugar on a table

By then, I’ve had a few more of that Brazilian, Columbian, Indian crème coffee that keeps me well centred (and slightly wired!).
And more importantly, I remember my little monthly effort as something I did to help.
Sure, it’s not as good as all the Superstars but it’s still my effort, within my circumstances.
And I like to do it manually instead of automatically because it keeps me aware and awareness is paramount, especially when things can crowd out those negative thoughts like ‘What is that monthly payment and why do I need to keep paying it??’ feeling, that can lead me to make Stone Cold prune and burn budget cuts we all make, to control our accounts.

If I could jump in my jet and fly to those starving kids and grab a busload of them and feed them with the things that will give them a better life, I would.
But I have no jet. Nor enough fruit, veges, meat and potatoes.
And I’m no Airy Fairy Idealist with a colourful rainbow idea of saving the World and turning some fish and a loaf of bread into a feast for 5, 000 hungry souls. But…
I have a little and I give it often.
Maybe you could too?

The Problem with Privilege.

Interestingly, the USA is trying to address both obesity and malnutrition.
But it is a far cry to say the US has a malnutrition epidemic.

40% of US adults and 18.5% of youths are obese.
90% of people in the US with Diabetes 2, are obese.
Obesity issues kill 300, 000 US people, every year.

Worldwide, more than 1.9 billion adults were overweight in 2019. That’s around 1 person out of 4.
And when you consider the two most malnourished countries in the world (China and India) with a combined population of 2.8 Billion people, it’s obvious malnutrition is NOT a real First World problem.
The privileged First World has the problem of too much.
It is an undeniable fact that poor food choices, lack of exercise and eating and drinking far too much, is the real First World epidemic.

Mud Cakes vs. Arse Fat in Your Lips


In the Third World, they eat cakes made of mud and chew the bark off trees if they can find any.
They look ten but are biologically aged, 17.
In our First World, we obsess over aging cream and sucking the fat out of our arse and injecting it into our cheeks or lips or chests.
In the Third World, they obsess over finding one more meal.
Or a Tree with bark.

Woman getting Botox in her lip
Injecting BOTOX into her lip


What can we do?
This has been about awareness; so now you are more aware than you were 5 minutes ago.
That’s good.
What you do with that awareness is yours to do.
For those who are ACTION types, here’s one way (that UNICEF LINK again).
For those who TREAD CAREFULLY and think Thoughtfully, here’s a LINK.
Oh yeah, guess what?

It’s the same LINK!
Why?
Because UNICEF have the transparency, the credibility, the history, the tools and resources, the commitment plus, the ABILITY TO DO WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE.
All they need are Action Heroes from the affluent and obese First World who will do more than sigh and sit on the Pity Potty, wringing their hands in pompous piety.

So.
What can you Do?

Your Comments Are Invited.

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6 thoughts on “WWW UNICEF ORG- worth the bother?

  1. People in first world countries often do not realize the ridiculousness of their complaints. I am from a first world country and I moved to Mexico a long time ago, and although it is considered a third world country I would not necessarily call it that. But anyway, when I went home to Belgium for a visit, many years ago and I heard a family member complain because the kitchen water wasn’t hot enough on a particular day. I told her “oh please, be grateful that you even have water.” That didn’t go down well with her, she simply didn’t understand why I brought that up and how it had to do anything with how she lived. This is just one example …

    In first world countries we take so much for granted and many choices we make indirectly affect people in other countries. Most of the effects we have no clue about. We can give, donate to Unicef, that’s an excellent initiative and we can also buy fair trade products and any other products that benefit certain countries and communities. Here in Mexico, if I see two products of different brands, one of them is made in China or made in he US and the second one is made in Mexico, I will buy the one that is made in Mexico, because it helps the local economy. Every small choice we make has an effect.

    1. Thank you for your comment. Life is relative, right? Your experiences in a World of poverty, economic difficulty and high crime changed your viewpoint so the relativity has shifted. I was brought up poor and even today, I abhor waste, although I can afford much. Supporting local business is not the choice of some as they look primarily at the price but we applaud those who can. UNICEF is one way to support the small and local businesses who have more of a need, compared to a chain or franchised store. Thank you for your comments.

  2. People in first world countries often do not realize the ridiculousness of their complaints. I am from a first world country and I moved to Mexico a long time ago, and although it is considered a third world country I would not necessarily call it that. But anyway, when I went home to Belgium for a visit, many years ago and I heard a family member complain because the kitchen water wasn’t hot enough on a particular day. I told her “oh please, be grateful that you even have water.” That didn’t go down well with her, she simply didn’t understand why I brought that up and how it had to do anything with how she lived. This is just one example …

    In first world countries we take so much for granted and many choices we make indirectly affect people in other countries. Most of the effects we have no clue about. We can give, donate to Unicef, that’s an excellent initiative and we can also buy fair trade products and any other products that benefit certain countries and communities. Here in Mexico, if I see two products of different brands, one of them is made in China or made in he US and the second one is made in Mexico, I will buy the one that is made in Mexico, because it helps the local economy. Every small choice we make has an effect.

    1. You are right. But everything is relative, wouldn’t you agree? The child who has a cake made of mud once every few days or eats a soup made from the bark of a tree, still smiles happily. He knows nothing else. Just like us First Worlders and our ‘Need to Diet Because I Eat Too Much MacDonalds’ problem… there is much we can do to make an equalising. The real question is Are we Prepared to Do it? Thanks for your thoughts.

  3. Great post and may God bless you in this effort to spread awareness of a real problem in the world that most Americans and people in the west overlook because food is so plentiful. I hope many people click on your link for UNICEF and start to become the solution and not just be part of the problem. Obesity and diabetes are real problems in the US and need to be addressed but worldwide malnutrition is more serious and needs to be solved as well. 

    1. I totally agree with you. We have a cheek… choosing whether we will be vegan, or vegetarian or what ever when there are people in the world eating cakes made of mud and soup made of tree bark. Something is definitely out of balance. Thanks for your thoughts.

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